Steilacoom Tribal Gift Shop

Steilacoom Tribal Gift Shop

Located in the Steilacoom Tribal Cultural Center and Museum

Have you been into the Steilacoom Tribal Gift Shop recently? We have so many different Native Made items for sale! Everything sold in our Tribal Gift Shop is Native American Made, by Indigenous Peoples from either North, Central, or South America.

Many of the Handmade items in our Tribal Gift Shop, like the Tribal Baskets pictured above, are made by Steilacoom Tribal Artists. The Handmade Dream Catcher below is also made by a Steilacoom Tribal Artist. If you are looking for Unique Native American Made gifts, come visit our Gift Shop!


We also have Steilacoom Tribal Logo items for sale in our Gift Shop. You can purchase a coat, shirt, hat or a Tumbler with the Steilacoom Tribe Logo, to show support of the Steilacoom Tribe. 


We have so many more fun, unique gift items for sale in our Gift Shop!

  The Steilacoom Tribal Cultural Center and Museum is currently Open on Saturdays between 10am-4pm. At this time we request that you schedule an appointment in advance. You can do this by using the "Book Now" button on our Facebook Page. You can also call us during business hours at 253-584-6308. Or send us a Message via Google, Facebook, or Instagram.

We look forward to visiting with you soon!

Find Us Here:

Address: 1515 Lafayette Street, Steilacoom, WA 98388

Phone: 253-584-6308

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SteilacoomTribe/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/steilacoom.tribe/ 

Book Now: https://fb.com/book/SteilacoomTribe/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTWVggLCA7aoBGRJ-pTkKAw

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/steilacoom-tribal-musuem 

TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@steilacoomtribe 




1903 Building History





Here is little history about the Historical Building that is currently owned and operated by the Steilacoom Tribe:

This historical building was originally owned by the Oberlin Congregational Church. According to historical records, the building was built using materials from the old church, which was torn down; as well as timbers from the Methodist Episcopal Church, which was built in 1854. This building, which today is the site of the Steilacoom Tribal Cultural Center and Museum, was completed and became the new home of the Oberlin Congregational Church in 1903. This building was their home until they chose to build in a new location, across the street, in 1961. At that time the original church building was sold and used as a home for over 20 years.

In 1987 the building was purchased by the Steilacoom Tribe. A dedication and Grand Opening was held on May 13, 1989. Our first exhibit was on the Pre-History of Washington State to celebrate the State’s Centennial.

“In the memory of the Tribal Ancestors who walked here before us, to be shared for all time with those that follow."~ May 13,1989 Dedication



A question that we hear often is, “Are you going to re-paint the building?” 


That’s a valid curiosity. The short answer is yes! The long answer is.....longer.

For those of you who do not know, the Steilacoom Tribe was not given a reservation (despite signing the Medicine Creek Treaty in 1854) and so does not receive federal funds. Everything is volunteer run, by the non-profit organization, Steilacoom Tribal Museum Association. All of our funding for projects (and to pay monthly bills that allows us to keep our Museum doors open on a regular basis) are received through fundraising and donations. When you visit the Museum on a Saturday you will find volunteers from the Steilacoom Tribe and their friends/family.

In 2012 we started renovations that were completed in 2014, to fix our front porch (which was separating from the building) and to add a wheelchair ramp with access to our upstairs. That was an awesome project that we were very excited about! Having wheelchair access to the upstairs gallery of our Museum was something that we had been dreaming about for years. It was wonderful to see that project completed!

We are currently working on funds to get renovations moving forward on the “paint” which is a lot more complicated than just paint. We had to have many inspections done, and since we are a Historical Building site, we have to make sure that we have permission and permits for any changes or work that gets done on our building. We have to have the siding inspected, to ensure that painting the current siding will work; and we may possibly have to have some (or all) of the siding replaced. It’s been quite a long process! In the past we have painted the building, only to have the paint shortly after begin to peal away just as before. That was a major clue for us that a lot more work needs to be done before we can cover the building with a fresh coat of paint.

But there is light at the end of this tunnel!! Keep a look-out because we will have updates coming soon on our current project to fix our building’s exterior. Check out our Facebook page for more information and regular updates.

Facebook   Instagram   Google Maps   Google Business Site




 

Steilacoom John & Annie


Steilacoom John & Annie, an image from the UW Libraries Digital Collection.

Notes from the UW site...
Steilacoom John was a leader of the Steilacoom Tribe who lived in the area around Chambers Creek and the territory surrounding Fort Steilacoom, Washington. This region, southwest of what is now Tacoma, was one of the earliest in the Puget Sound region to be occupied by white settlers. John was a son of Ce-col-quin, a signer of the 1854 Medicine Creek Treaty, and he led an extended family that camped at McNeil Island each summer. In this photograph, John and his wife Annie are seated in front of their home with a basket and other household items. The stereographic image was part of a series made by J.A. Blosser illustrating Pacific Northwest scenes.

Repair & Renovations


August 2012. The renovations have started!

There are many projects in store to repair and renovate the Steilacoom Tribal Cultural Center & Museum. First on the list: construct a ramp to the front door for disabled access to the 2nd floor. This is required for the Center & Museum to officially keep it's doors open to the public. Once the ramp is complete, the portico will be re-added to the exterior of the building.

Future projects include a secondary exit from the 2nd floor for public safety (also required for the Center & Museum to keep it's doors officially open), renovations to the kitchen and cafe on the first floor, and repair and improvements to the exterior of the building.

Photos from August 2012:

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In The News: 'Stick Soup'


5/22/2011 - Lynn Geyer of The Suburban Times recently reported on the play, Stick Soup, by Danny Marshall and Lacie Deck in her article 'Stick Soup' brings Steilacoom legends to life.

The new "Liq'təd Garden"


6/29/10 - We recently finished a new garden at the STCC called the "Liq'təd Garden". Liq'təd (pronounced leek'tud) is a Lushootseed word for 'red-colored' or 'painted-red'. The garden recognizes and honors "Steilacoom Red" that came from the sacred spring in Steilacoom that produced a red iron oxide clay that the Steilacoom traded with other Tribes.

The project started with a lot of grass, blackberries, and weeds, but over several days it transformed into a beautiful Homestead-inspired garden that now features oak half-barrels and wood chips donated by the Town of Steilacoom. The lower section of the garden surrounds an existing cement pad and is planted with salal, a native plant popular for its berries that are both tasty and used to dye various materials.

We invite you to visit the new garden on the south side of the STCC and to come back soon and often as the red flowers displayed in the garden will change regularly to reflect the seasons.